Calm your dog’s Energy and behavioral problems disappear!

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One of the main issues I see that is tremendously lacking in thousands of homes, as I behaviorally rehab dogs and instruct their owners, is the simple understanding that dogs communicate constantly through their energy and body language.  Dogs are almost always talking!  Are we accurately reading them and honestly listening?  Dogs are constantly telling us what they need or want and this, in turn, tells us how to help them.  And the amazing thing about that is that dogs don’t lie.  They don’t deceive or fall prey to mankind’s greatest weaknesses, such as inflated ego, criticism, materialism, consumerism, or attempting to live a life that flows against Mother Nature.  When we can take our eyes off ourselves for a moment we can truly see, appreciate, and then help a dog or pup in need.

If you begin to think of a dog as furry energy, you will start to see how you can help calm that animal’s brain in that moment in time.  This is the answer to any dog behavioral issueProblems arise when most typical dog trainers, dog behaviorists, vets, vet techs, dog rescue groups, groomers and other dog professionals do not use enough natural calming techniques.  Many dog professionals seldom consider how dogs need to be calmed down in order to be social, and instead just forge ahead with the same typical training techniques no matter what the dog is communicating with its energy and body.

Typical training uses way too much excitement.  Please re-read that last sentence.  We have been sold the concept that an excited dog is a happy dog.  In many circumstances nothing could be further from the truth.  When we realize that the canine uses differing levels of excitement/energy like a human uses words to communicate, we start to understand that being excited does not always mean the dog is happy.  In fact, many dogs are overexcitement junkies.  They are stuck in horrible habits of overexcitement because they have not been shown how to stop the addiction, or shown they have crossed a social boundary in the household.  Remember, not all excitement is good.  Playing ball or wrestling with your dog is good excitement.  Pulling nonstop on leash or freaking out at another dog or person is not good.  As humans, we get excited to go on vacation and that’s great but we also become excited when in a warzone or if we were running from a dangerous murderer.  Not all excitement means we are happy.

Out of control much?

Most training also seldom considers what the animal may actually need and instead goes right into manipulating the dog, usually using something exciting (treats, toys, praise), into a sit, down or stay.  We as a society are hyper fixated for some very odd reason with making our dogs sit.  I see countless people every day making their dogs sit and sit and sit some more.  I ask you this simple question…Why?  Has it solved the dog’s behavioral issue? Has it made them calm their energy enough to change the undesirable behavior into something much better. or do they just end up, literally, placing their bottom on the ground for a moment and only to pop back up into whatever behavior they want?  Or, if the “sit, stay or wait,” works and is fairly strong and the person has practiced that with the dog and done prior training, the dog will then remain in the “sit, stay, wait” yet all the while building more energy and overexcitement.  Then, when the owner releases the dog, the dog ends up still exploding forward into the undesired behavior!  What has the sit (stay, wait) done for you?  What was gained?  In many cases the dogs use it to manipulate and raise their energy which is the OPPOSITE of what the owner wants and what the dog wants deep down inside.

Instinctually, no dog wants to be hyper or out of control.  They are just locked into a habit of raising their energy.  Many dogs I see yearn for more natural rules and boundaries so they can learn how to calm themselves down and exist more comfortably with their families at a more sociable level.  This leads to more pleasant outings and a larger social group.  And, as we know, instinctually for a pack predator (with amazing instincts right from the wolf) getting along in a large social group and operating like a well-oiled-machine is what being a healthy dog is all about.  Being social is the key.  But you have to be calm enough to get along socially!

Consider your dog’s energy levels while patiently existing in the moment with them, read their body language more effectively and then you will have an amazing foundation to prevent or cure any behavioral issue.

“The more tranquil a man becomes the greater is his success, his influence, his power for good.  Calmness of mind is one of the beautiful jewels of wisdom.”  -James Allen

Hope you all enjoyed this article.  Check out my real website at www.gstevensdogtrainer.com Stay tuned for other excellent dogformation from yours truly, thecaninecalmer.  Look for little dogortunities to work with your dogs or pups throughout the day.  Keep a sharp eye out for my up coming book!  And above all, stay persistent yet calm.

-Garrett Stevens

Alpha and Omega Dog Training

Any Breed, Any Age, Any Problem

www.gstevensdogtrainer.com

There is nothing “Zen” about bribing a dog with food!

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There is nothing “Zen” or unique, or special, or beneficial, or even remotely interesting about bribing a dog with food.  Any FOOL can make a dog or pup perform a “watch me” command by sticking a food treat near a dog’s nose and then holding it up to their own eye.  This then causes the pup to look up at the person’s face.  This is the most basic and almost unmentionable start of typical training across the land.  This is exactly the method used by big chain store (but usually low-quality) trainers!

Image result for yin yang with a dog

Trainers that talk about “balance” and “zen” and things of this nature cannot be taken seriously if their main methods are based in excitably stuffing food treats down the pup’s throat!

 

Does this mean you should never use food treats?  No, of course not.  You can use food treats to the advantage of your relationship with your dog occasionally.  But we should NEVER start the foundation of obedience and training and behavior modification with food!!!!!!!   Those that do are treating our domesticated dogs just like a wild animal!  

When the mother and father dog build a relationship based on respect and trust and communication with their pups are they using food treats?  Is the pup’s misbehavior ignored or addressed by the parent dogs or is it constantly “redirected” with food or toys like many bad trainers and bad behaviorists would teach you to do with your pup?  Does the mother dog use a clicker and come equipped with treats and high-pitched praise?

When raising my own pups into adult doghood I used treats.  Shocking to some of you, I know.  Let me clarify…I used treats properly.  As TREATS not as CONSTANTS or NONSTOPS and it was only as an OCCASIONAL Supplement and never based on the behavior.  

Save using treats for behavior for when you want to bribe a wild squirrel at the park to come into your spatial bubble or focus on you.  You can extend your arm and hold out a peanut.  The squirrel will then slowly come over within arm’s reach and take the treat from you.  Congrats!  (Not really – I’m being sarcastic) You just earned a little bit of ill-balanced trust from a wild creature.  I say “ill-balanced” because that is exactly what it is.

Does that squirrel respect you?  Do you really respect and know the language and social cues of the squirrel?  Have you taken the easy way out and just bribed the furry thing to come to you.  Will the squirrel come to you in an emergency?  Will the squirrel only come if there’s food?  Does the squirrel have thousands and thousands and thousands of years of domestication and close partnership living in our homes and working for and with humans?

Image result for squirrel

Food is a very poor replacement for actual trust and respect and communication!!!!

 

Are you starting to understand why food treats used with dogs and pups can be largely unnecessary except as an occasional supplement  to motivation?

Food treats are an external motivator and have Nothing to do with the internal motivation and intrinsic relationship between you and your dog or pup!  Also if we want calmness and more relaxation in our housedog why are we constantly adding more excitement through treats?!

Beware the over-simplified and extremely dogmatic viewpoint of training and behavior mod. from proponents of “positive only” of “force free” folks…talk about short-sighted imbalanced and unnatural methods that contribute to the terrible rise in dog fear, hyperactivity, and aggression!  Wooooohoooooo

We differ from all those status quo trainer and behaviorists because, unlike them, we know our dogs are socially brilliant and unlike them, we know as we go into the future together we don’t actually want to constantly have to be our dog’s focus point and the answer to every question our dog has.  THIS out-dated concept: where the owner is the constant answer to every problem in the dog’s life leads to excessive bribery with treats  in training methods and the unnatural over-focus on the owner in order for the dog to ignore every natural and social thing that happens to occur in the environment.  This is unnatural and tends to backfire often!  Personally I don’t want to be the answer to everything in my dog’s life…it’s too much work!  The mother dog doesn’t want to be the answer for everything either!  That should be a TEMPORARY position we have until the pup reaches maturity and has more self-control.  Our dogs should look to us for many answers…but not all of them.  They need to learn calmness and self-control so we don’t have to forever be “training” them.  They need to be respectful of our shared society and they need to be TRUSTWORTHY.

Believe us, we know, because we are constantly re-training after so many Tacoma and Seattle dog training companies focus on the frivolous tricks and obedience while sacrificing the more important internal issues at hand.

Here at Alpha and Omega Dog Training we strive to be balanced and this is what yields the tremendous, real results our clients rave about.  

The housedog of the future should be calm enough to NOT have to perform “watch me” or a “focus” command every two seconds and should be trustworthy enough to be left almost unattended, or at least partially ignored and not have to perform a “down stay” or some other frivolous form of obedience training with us keeping a sharp eye on them for ever!!!

Cultivate a real relationship based on respect and trust and calmness and communication and you’ll never regret it!   

-G

Questions?  We love comments and questions.  Keep an eye out for my coming book!  We are shopping publishers very soon!!!!

Quick QUESTIONS for you

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Quick questions may require long consideration and critical contemplation.  If we ask the right questions we get the right answers.  Here are some questions to really mull over.

 

Do we as the human race really have our dogs best interests at heart?

Do we as human beings value our dogs over and above what or how they should be valued or do we undervalue them?

Did you know we have never attempted to rescue as many dogs in the USA as we are currently?

Did you know dog bites (and dog attacks on people) are on the rise?

Have you ever been bitten?

Are our dogs giving back to us as much as we are giving to them and vice-versa?

Do you take a realistic viewpoint of the dog and their many behaviors do you have an over-simplistic, anthropomorphized viewpoint?

Are treats exciting for our dogs?

Is excitement actually good and beneficial to our dogs?

Do parent dogs exhibit a lot of excitement around their pups and vice-versa?

How does excitement and high energy play a role in most of mother nature?

Is calmness valued by the mother or father dog?

Who is calmer the older dogs or the younger ones?

Are we all applying calmness when interacting with our dogs and pups?

Are professional trainers and behaviorists using calmness or excitement in their training methods?

Does your dog come with a laundry list of rules (don’t poke the bear!)…things you can’t touch on his/her body, things you can’t do around the dog, things guests can’t do?

Is your dog rude or polite?

Do dogs think positively or negatively or not at all like that?

What is your favorite sense (out of the five senses)?

What is our dogs favored sense or senses?

If you were to lose a sense which would you chose and why?

If your dog was to lose a sense which would he/she choose and why?

 

These are just a couple of the quick questions I wanted to share with the masses out there in internet land.  I have several others for another time.

Please feel free to comment or answer some of them in the comments section.  These are not to trick or insult or manipulate you in any way.  I just want to hopefully broaden people’s minds and delve a bit deeper into the fascinating creatures we all have such familiarity with.

Keep an eye out for my coming book!  In it we ask and answer many of the above questions and of course the book will greatly help prevent or reverse behavioral issues you may be facing with your dog or pup.  There are great chapters on Touch, Spacial control, Energy control, Calmness, Heeling and Leash work, Dog manipulations, Myths, and much, much more!  There are illustrations.  There are motivations.  There are challenges.  There is a call to action.  The book should broaden anyone’s mind on the subject of our dogs, their behavior, and our behaviors with them.  It broadens my mind every time I add to or examine it.

-G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

famous dogs in literature

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Argos (Homer The Odyssey)

The Hound of the Baskervilles (Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Sherlock Holmes)

Cerberus (Hades’ dog who guards the way outta’ hell)

Little Ann and Big Dan -coonhounds (Wilson Rawls Where the red fern grows)

Buck and White Fang – St. Bernard mix and a Wolf dog (Jack London’s tales)

Merle retriever-hound (Ted Kerasote Merle’s door)

Nana -Newfie (JM Barrie’s Peter Pan)

Old Yeller -yellow blackmouth cur (Fred Gipson’s 1956 novel)

Toto – cairn terrier (Wonderful Wizard of Oz L Frank Baum)

Clifford the Big Red Dog – lab/vizsla (Norman Bridwell)

Fang- Boerhound (Neomastiff in movies) Jk Rowling’s Harry Potter

Snoopy – Beagle (Charles Schultz Peanuts cartoon strip)

Odie (Jim Davis Garfield cartoon strip)

Lassie-Collie (Eric Knight wrote a short story for the Saturday Evening post in 1938)

Tock -a watchdog (Norton Juster The Phantom Toll booth)

Shiloh- Beagle (Phyliss R Naylor Shiloh)

Winn-Dixie (Kate DiCamillo Because of Winn-Dixie)

 

 

 

 

The amazingly accelerated growth rate of our dogs (and how it really applies to training!)

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Have you heard the old saying that one human year of life is the equivalent of seven dog years?  Most of us have and have readily believed it but I’ve got some news for you…it’s totally Wrong!  Let me clarify.

 

In case you didn’t know…A human and a dog are totally different biological creatures and should not be compared with each other in terms of longevity.  As humans we tend to over-think things and usually fall into thinking subjectively on most subjects.  That aside let’s just assume for the sake of this article that we did compare the longevity and growth rate of dogs vs. humans.   Let’s take a closer look at how the accelerated growth rate of our pups (in comparison with a human’s growth rate) can really make or break training and behavioral development.

It takes 1 year to raise a good dog but you’ve got 18 years to try and raise a respectable human!  Let me tell you, dogs are easier!  (Personally I have and am raising both dogs and children) In my day-to-day business of successfully training and behaviorally modifying owners’ habits and their dogs I see many dogs that still act much younger than how they could or should be acting at the age they are at.  Is your dog presenting bad or unsocial or rude behaviors that could be or should have been done away with by six months of age?  For many of you out there the answer is sadly, Yes.

Year one:  puppy goes from the human equivalent of newborn to one-year-old to human equivalent of 15-17 years!

In the pups first year they are transformed from newborn to toddler and from toddler right to what would be the human equivalent of an older teenager ready to breed and looking for independence and responsibility!  The growth rate is astronomical!  If you have a small breed dog the transformation happens even faster because they simply do not have as much growing physically to do.  Please, never forget behaviorally speaking that the brain and body of your dog are so much more closely linked and functioning together than our own imagining, time-traveling human brains.  There’s another saying that we as humans think of our bodies as, “a vehicle that brings our brains to meetings.”  All animals know better though.  They go through life richly connected to their senses and are contented and happy with the simple pleasures.  They are always alive to the moment.  If we miss critical training and behavioral lessons as well as the all important socialization factor at early stages we are doing our new pups great harm!

 

Year two: Teenager pup can add another 10 human years of growth!

Take advantage of the time.  Take action today!  Get your dog or pup outside and socialized.  If you can’t due to behavioral issues that are too great to handle and you’ve been doing the, “Let me put the dog away.” when you have guests, or the classic, “I’ll just cross to the other side of the street when I’m out walking my dogs because they go crazy.”  or even worse, “I’ll walk my dog at 3:00 a.m. so we don’t run into any dogs or people!”  You are shrinking your dogs social circle and time is working against you!  (Helpful Suggested Reading:  my blog- thecaninecalmer.wordpress.com  please Subscribe, The Slight Edge by Jeff Olsen)  You are literally exacerbating the dog or pup’s issues and you are running out of time!

 

(If you already have a dog older than 2 and they have behavioral issues please understand normal training, group classes, obedience training, agility, schutzhund, herding, et cetera will NOT help your dog get over their anxiety, their aggression, their fear, or whatever other crazy, unsocial or rude behavioral patterns they are presenting…all that training will only add frivolous tricks to the equation and cost you plenty of money.  Instead of going that route seek out real help based in calmness and how dog’s move, think, and act in the environment and space around them.

Contact us if you need assistance.  We are rapidly expanding!  My book is almost complete, we are working on training and behavioral videos that will be available for purchase, our training collar works amazingly well (better than most tools on the market), and word keeps spreading about the fantastic difference our natural, calming methods provide for our clients.

Go to gstevensdogtrainer.com for more info

Getting Buff

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Do you exercise?  If not, why not?  And if so, for how long?

If you own a dog the answer should always be a resounding YES, of course I exercise!  And if you own a dog make sure your dog gets physically drained of energy… many times to the point of real exhaustion and good hard panting.  Exercise them till they literally have to drop when they come home and just breath!  

Exercise cures and prevents a host of behavioral issues in our dogs and ourselves.  The positive effects of exercise are well known and documented.  I will not waste time going into all that evidence.

Here are a couple good quotes on exercise…

“The only bad workout is the one that didn’t happen.”

“You can have results or excuses – not both.”

“It does not matter how slowly you go, so long as you do not stop.”

Exercise is a proven reliever or of negative stress = subtraction.  You may find that interesting because what do we do when exercising but add beneficial stress = addition.  That is what exercise is!  The addition of beneficial stress to our body which challenges the right things to grow and removes and reduces the wrong things.  Exercise done properly always stretches the capacity.  I love that!  All of nature bears witness to balance that exists.  Addition and subtraction.

Behaviorally working with your dog is no different.  It should always stretch the capacity, and enlarge the zone you are targeting.  It should leave both you and your dog or puppy calmer, less stressed, and literally healthier… which will lead to strength and confidence in the future.

Always push the boundaries.  Always go past former plateaus.

 

 

-G

5000 Mastiffs

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In the 13th century the Mongol emperor Kublai Khan owned 5000 Mastiffs.  He used them for hunting and war.

We’ve all heard about the “crazy cat lady” who hoards and “rescues” every cat near and far but Kublai clearly had her beat with his 5000 dogs!

Many believe this was the most dogs ever owned by one person.  That is one giant kennel loaded with giant dogs.

pic is of a Neo Mastiff

 

I can only imagine the poor bloke who had to pick up after the 5000 Mastiffs!  Talk about a crappy job.

 

(keeping my posts brief, folks, because I’m getting close to finishing my BOOK!)  -G

Fathom the insanity of a human being who teaches you that you can never disagree with your dog!

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People are nuts.  We are.  If you can’t agree with me that people are nuts please stop reading Now.

For those that can recognize that as humans we are a bit crazy I want to direct your thoughts towards this current crazy time in history.  This interesting time in our lives where we find we have several thousands of professional dog trainers and professional behaviorists that actual teach and want to keep teaching you (as the owner of your dog) that you shouldn’t ever disagree with your dog or pup!  Think about that for a second.

What have we come to?  How has it come to this babying, this coddling, this ridiculously imbalanced and greatly disconnected, poor-excuse for a relationship with our dogs?  How and why do so many pet pros talk dogmatically with 100% absolutism (and quite ferociously toward anyone who might disagree until they are shouted down) about the evil of corrections and that you should never “force” your dog to do anything?  I encourage you to take those questions ponder them honestly and then consider and ask why we also currently have a terrible dog bite record (dogs attacking humans and attacking other dogs) and it’s been steadily increasing for the worse!  I know the two are deeply connected!

 

Don’t just go with the majorities opinion on this topic of disagreeing with your dog vs positive-only and force-free methods.  Please THINK for Yourself and come to your own conclusions.  Examine history, examine the stats, examine the methods of different pro trainers and behaviorists (and especially note and examine their results) and most of all… examine your own dog and the history of dogs and how dogs think and how they experience the world and how dogs communicate and behave.

Then ask yourselves…would the mother dog or father dog constantly bribe their pups with food treats?  Would they constantly attempt to condition them or would they seek to build a healthy relationship based on the dog language and respect and trust and manners (not frivolous tricks and obedience commands)?  Would the parent dogs ever disagree with their young?  Have you as a parent ever had to disagree with your own children?  Was it beneficial in any way?  Did you overdo it or under-do it?

 

What is lacking in our current culture is the balanced approach to disagreeing and so the pathetic “positive-only” dogmatists (who aren’t really that positive in their own lives) scream and shout about how any correction, any disagreement, or forcing your dog or pup to do anything is totally wrong!  Let me tell you outright…this is hogwash and they are wrong!  It’s only wrong to correct or disagree if you are performing it wrong.

Dogs speak through movement, energy, smells, and touching. Most people I meet (and I do this non-stop) are woefully, dreadfully unaware of the intricate and marvelous language of our dogs.  They are woefully unaware because MOST pro behaviorist and trainers are horribly unaware!  The common pro trainer/behaviorist whole premise and approach to training is not beneficial and does NOT prevent behavioral issues from developing!!!

But let’s cut them some slack for a moment.  I don’t want to be too hasty.  Maybe these “professional dog trainers” and “scientific professional behaviorists” haven’t ever see older dogs and how they talk to and deal with younger dogs?  Maybe they haven’t seen the older, balanced dog correct and address the younger imbalanced one?  Maybe these so called “pros” haven’t ever visited a local dog park and observed the dog language?  Maybe they’ve been too long in the library reading about dogs or too long in the laboratory or in the classroom?  Maybe they haven’t had kids of their own or cultivated healthy relationships in their own personal lives?  I don’t know.  What I do know is that anyone who proclaims the “positive-only” approach or acts as a behaviorist and over-charges their clients because they used to work with dolphins is NOT keyed into the amazingly close and wonderfully easy and direct relationship available to us with our domesticated dogs and pups!

They say “Never force a dog to do anything.”  This is horribly bad advice!  I force dogs to do things all the time (and I do it incredibly gently and smoothly) and they end up thanking me for it!  And the owners are also able to soon witness their once terribly behaved aggressive or fearful dogs actually make good decisions.  They see it happen before their very eyes!

One example: I force the nervous dog into social situations and then ask it (in dogspeak) to behave itself (not just do frivolous tricks).  This is the only thing that will change the nervous dog into being social and normal and balanced.

I am a professional because I equip the owners and the dog and get them social extremely quickly all while expanding the dog’s capacity for more and more social situations and all without harsh corrections and without foolishly stuffing food treats down the dog’s throat non-stop and calling it science!  Yes, positive reinforcement is science…it’s OLD science and based on the external motivation of the dog and none of it’s internal drives and motivations!  I’m not even going to bring up the fact that bribing with food is also highly exciting and that over-excitement is the cause of every single behavioral issue any dog faces.  Food treats is not the natural way of parenting.  Bribing with food is how most trainers train WILD animals and that’s fine…but for our domesticated dogs…it’s crap!

Let’s all recognize that many humans are insane and let’s take measured steps to respect their beliefs and opinions, however crazy, but understand it is more than ok to adamantly disagree with their foolishness and to think for ourselves.  Your dogs and pups will thank you!

Seek out the natural ways.  You Can reward your dogs and pups but you Can also disagree with them too and sometimes “force” them into areas of their lives that their fears or aggression would never have taken them before your help!  Stretching the capacity and enlarging the relaxation is the name of the game!  Remember both rewards and corrections should not be the focus…A HEALTHY RELATIONSHIP IS THE FOCUS!!!

Questions?  Call us!  And keep an eye out for my coming book…it’s gonna’ be epic!  And balanced with natural techniques and they will, of course, get you the best results you could imagine!  Forget positive or negative reinforcement and focus on being a dog parent.

-G