I was attacked

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I was attacked!  It came from out of nowhere as attacks tend to.  I suppose the attacker has to rely on the intensity and surprise of the attack in an attempt to get the upper hand in the situation.

I was attacked by a person who has never met me before and has little to no knowledge of who I am or what I do (my work with dogs) yet they went on an extreme, vitriol-filled rant (from behind the safety of a computer screen) to the point of attacking my business, my credentials, my professionalism, and then posting fake reviews of my services and getting their two or three friends to post fake reviews too!  Apparently they think libel and defamation are OK.

And get this….the attacks came from alleged “Positive” people that use or believe so rigidly and so vehemently in their “positive only” approaches to dog training – basically “positive only” means the feeding of treats, praise, petting and the usual pumping up of the dog’s excitement in a large majority of circumstances any time the dog behaves appropriately – they believe so strongly (or blindly) that they pre-judged me and my natural CALMING and Socializing methods (which I have learned from observing how older, calm and social dogs deal with things.)  They went to every known website I have and gave horrible reviews of my services although I don’t know them from Adam and have never even worked with their dogs.  In fact they live clear across the country and in other nations!

How much of a waste of energy for them and how telling of their personality and character (or lack thereof) and how hypocritical!  Allegedly acting positive towards dogs while personally attacking humans?

I take it as a compliment.  Revolutionaries are seldom welcomed into social circles in society with open arms.  And my aim is to revolutionize the “dog training world” with better, calmer, more social methods using less bribery, and or, less harshness. This person threw around the word “Science” and “Scientifically proven” and proceeded to give links to how dolphins, hyenas, etc can be trained using treats – like anyone doesn’t already know that!?  The point is…dogs live closer to us than any other creature on earth, they are domesticated and why would I want to treat them like some dolphin that is now in captivity?  Dog deserve more credit than that.  We should be able to calmly disagree with them just like we can our own children – for their benefit!  Remember, the best scientific minds of centuries past all believed the earth was flat and they would practically burn heretics at the stake for suggesting otherwise!

True science is about actual exploration, boldness, and discovery, and the main rule is to attempt to study the subject without our human biases and understanding. No anthropomorphising!  Instead we should be reaching for new levels of understanding through the experiences and true observation.  The opposite of real science is Googling something on the internet and suddenly your an expert on the right way to dog train or just going with what is the large popular opinion.  There is nothing so free in this world as people’s opinions.

My testimonials speak much louder to my credentials, services, and character than I ever could…for more info go to http://www.gstevensdogtrainer.com

Ask yourself why would so many, many other pet professionals (dog daycare owners, kennels, vets, groomers) highly recommend me and my services if I was not the absolute best?  If you search for trainers you can find them under every rock… but why do pet professionals who work with hundreds/thousands of dogs and people almost every day…why do they recommend me again and again?  Because of the amazing results that calmness and social behavior can bring to the table.  It is far beyond bribing with treats or (on the opposite end) old-school harsh corrections.

Listen up – Dog trainers, dog behaviorists, dog whisperers, vets, groomers, daycare owners, etc……………………………….There is a huge gap in the “dog training world” today and simple internet searches will testify to this fact.  On one side there are the “Positive” method only group – who seem to really flip out with aggression and anger to anyone who does not agree with them!  I’m talking about many Entire websites set up just to Bash other forms of dog training!  On the other side I think there is a bit more common sense approaches to training but there are still many who use a leash pop correction for anything and everything – this is obviously too far gone as well.  Why not a balance folks?

IF you are going to be extreme and dogmatic over anything concerning dogs than be extremely observant.  Be extremely patient.  Be extremely honest.  Be extremely free of other people’s opinions.  Be extremely willing to learn with each and every dog.  Be extremely ready to change your routine to a better one if needed.  Be extremely relaxed.  Be extremely social.  And be extremely balanced in your methods!

 

top photo credit: trendhunter.com

 

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Introducing a Rescue dog to your home

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When introducing a Rescue dog or Shelter dog to your home it is important to remember not to listen to your instincts.  As a human being in today’s society your instincts are probably wrong, greatly dulled, or, from excessive TV watching and or drooling over your stupid phone, just plain non-existent! The common person’s instincts when it comes to dealing with nervous, anxious, aggressive, excitable, hyper, dominant, or an otherwise imbalanced dog are, in the main, dead wrong.  A plethora of rescue dogs have serious issues that come out a couple weeks after being in the new home!

And believe me, you may think your new rescue dog is a, “real lover” (meaning the dog constantly loves to receive attention and be patted or pet by you and gets up on your lap, or stays right by your side, or licks/kisses you often) but to me that’s a clear warning sign…Proceed with caution!

 

Most rescue dogs are on their very best behavior when they are put into a new home.  Keep this in mind and enjoy the short interlude (honeymoon phase) because after three or four weeks (sometimes sooner) of living and getting accustom to the home environment the poor owner is suddenly confounded and befuddled when their, “precious, lovable, new, furry, family member,” decides to growl at someone in order to claim something in the house, or suddenly develops housebreaking issues, or is acting more nervous and fearful by the day, or starts to bark or guard the front door from any and all visitors and loved ones, or starts to act insane on leash, or, perhaps the most sinister of all, just starts to slowly but deliberately dominate and manipulate any and all things to his/her doggy advantage! (How’s that for a run-on sentence?)  Many dogs do this before the human is even aware of what’s going on!  Soon the dog has out-touched, out-maneuvered, and in general just outdone the human being.  The dog has built a relationship that wasn’t based on respect with the new owner and a wise person would Not trust that dog.

You thought you had a, “real lover” on your hands and so you decided to keep up the constant petting, baby talk, and giving of treats to bribe your way into a cozy relationship with your new rescue dog… you didn’t realize you were feeding and reinforcing a state of mind probably dominated by Fear and manipulation.  You were unaware how intelligent and manipulative this furry creature could be.  This happens on a daily basis across the world and I see it everyday in my business with the dogs!  My third book on dog behavior (coming out 2019) is all about Shelter/Rescue dogs and the incredibly critical first few weeks they are brought into the new home!  Keep a sharp eye out for it and, in the meantime, read Dog Myths and So Long Separation Anxiety (available on Amazon and everywhere else) they will truly help you understand the dog language and see where the dog training industry and the dog rescue industry has gone off the rails!

Emotional decision or Logical decision?

The human, after seeing a singing Sarah Mclachlan commercial and feeling awful (weak energy!) goes out and decides to make a difference in at least one animal’s life.  And then the downward spiral of manipulation begins.  The person didn’t even know the dog was that fearful until something in the environment finally triggers the fear.  Or, if the new owner did recognize the fear they do the one thing to make it infinitely worse and give the fearful mind what it wants…the ability to remain fearful!  They let the dog use them as a comfort blankey 24/7!  The rescue dog then continues and often increases the use of unsocial fight/flight habits mixed with escalated out of control energy levels.  Another common mistake that new rescue owners make is their fixation on frivolous dog training tricks like sit or stay.  While sit and stay are fine commands to teach the dog please do NOT be fooled, they are nothing in comparison to the value of healthy relationship based in respect, trust, clear communication, proper dog language – which entails correct energy levels, proper positioning of the physical body, and the ever important, who is touching who and how that touch is being applied!  Most dog training falls utterly short of what is really important to our dogs and to our bonding properly with them.

Here are some Don’t and Dos that will really help you…

Don’t label and keep the “rescue dog” as a victim for very long.  Let the dog move on…basically Don’t live in the past and use weak energy with your dog.  Almost any and every single rescue dog owner I’ve ever met with fails horribly in this regard and, if we’re being honest here, psychologically handicaps their new dog from having a healthy future (See my other post on, “Dealing with a fearful dog.”)

Don’t let the dog smell the whole house.  Why would I give the new rescue dog access to the whole house?  The dog should earn access to more rooms and levels of your home after a number of weeks.

Don’t let the dog constantly use you as a comfort blanket and Don’t let it always touch you or “love” on you.  This is probably the most important on the list!!!

Don’t let the new rescue sleep in your bed or any humans’ bed.  This can quickly lead to behavioral issues as many dogs may soon start to claim certain spots or the whole bed itself as their own.

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This is Cato our Pitbull/Cane Corso mix. He is a rescue and will be featured in my upcoming book on rescue dogs!

Do exercise the hell out of the dog.  This is a great time to show leadership (work the heel position), drain energy, release stress, bond as a pack, and explore and socialize with your new companion.  Take the dog everywhere and also have people over as guests in your home during the honeymoon phase.  Set the tone.

Do make the dog work for praise, affection and it’s breakfast sometimes.  I said sometimes because flexibility is what we are after.  Dogs can be fantastic adapters but only if you help them along the way.

Do make it clear that any and all humans are the owners of everything in the dog’s life including the dog’s own body!  This is a very important “do.”

Do follow this blog and please tell your family and friends to do so too for more excellent and enlightening info!

And above all else…DO DO DO DO drop what you’re doing and order my book(s) on dog and human behavior!  They are completely unique to what is being taught by the mainstream dog training industry and because of that – The info contained within my books will make you wildly successful with your dogs!  Here is the link to the first one

Dog Myths: What you Believe about dogs can come back to BITE You! by Garrett Stevens

This book will forever alter the way you look at dogs and pups (in a great way).  It will help anyone with any aged dog with a plethora of doggy problems.  Dog Myths is an absolute necessity for someone with a rescue dog.  Order two or three because after you read the first chapter you’ll want to give it and share it with others in your life!  While you’re at it grab my second book, SO LONG SEPARATION ANXIETY and in this way prevent or reverse anxiety in your new shelter dog!

Feel free to leave questions or comments.  If your rescue is fearful or aggressive read my other post entitled “Dealing with a fearful dog.”  Remember to go to my business website for some great products that can truly help you and your new pooch!  Our training collar will change your life.   http://www.gstevensdogtrainer.com

Thanks much

-G

 

If you’re taking your aggressive, fearful or growling dog to a “growly” class or a “reactive” dog class…you are Not getting good training

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“Growly dog classes” are for suckers.

All canines are creatures that survive in a pack.  A family group.  This means they can be influenced by peer pressure.  I am always shocked how foolish dog trainers and dog behaviorists will hold “growly dog” classes!

Why on earth would I want to bring an already unstable, aggressive, fearful, hyper, dominant or otherwise unsocial dog into a group of dogs suffering the same afflictions?  The idea is that we can all work on these issues together, right?  Wrong.  This only sets up your “growly” dog for failure and gives them no good example dogs to learn from.  Yes, socialization is key and one of the only things to really help our aggressive or fearful dogs but it needs to be done in the right way.  Naturally our pups and dogs want and need to learn by watching the older dog (in the wild the older canine is always balanced and a great social communicator).  “Growly dog classes” are a waste of time and money.

Now if you had a group of balanced, calm, social dogs and you brought your unbalanced, out of control, “growly” dog into that group…..Now you are talking!  Now there’s a solution!

Remember folks, all the greatest scientific and medical minds in society many years ago believed that the earth was flat!  Turns out they were dead wrong.  Just because society (or the majority) believes something it in no way means it is true!

Keep exploring and discovering your dog.

-Garrett