To correct or not to correct, that is the question?

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In today’s world filled with every conceivable type of information speeding to us from any and every source imaginable it is often hard to decipher which methods of training are beneficial to our dogs and their behavior.  We have all been inundated with info.  We have fat heads and our brains are overweight and in desperate need of an informational diet.

Help!!! Information Overload………………………….

 

We need clean, wholesome, healthy information and must beware overeating any foolish bit of dog training info that is out there.  Remember, if a common dog training method is largely accepted and you are tempted to gulp it down please consider the many people stuffing their faces with fast food because it’s convenient, cheap, abundant, and also largely accepted!

 

Just because the majority believes in something doesn’t mean it is true or the best way.  Always seek the natural answer when dealing with an animal.

One hot button topic many would even consider taboo is whether or not we should “correct” our dogs or pups.  In this article I will give you a few good reasons to correct your dogs or pups.  Reasons that line up 100% with what the dogs teach us.  Reasons that line up with what any astute person can readily observe within a dog park, dog daycare, or group of three or more dogs.  Reasons that come straight from the dogs!  I will show you that corrections, if performed correctly, are extremely BENEFICIAL to your dog or pup!

First let’s cut through some of the crazy extremeness that exists in the dog training and behavioral community at large. In search of training companies or behaviorists or even vets please beware any extreme dogmatism where training is concerned!  Make sure the methods are based very specifically on domesticated dogs (not other random wild animals) and based on mother nature’s calming methods. And, above all, make sure the trainer or behaviorist gets tremendous results!

There should be no crazed high-pitched excitable talk, constant giving of treats, or other foolish bribery in the training methods.  If you (or your trainer) act that way ask yourself, Isn’t that how a puppy acts?  And if a pup acts all hyper and high-pitched and over-excited then, Who is going to take the role of leader in your relationship?

Dogs correct other dogs constantly.  Mother and Father dog correct their young constantly.  If more people just looked at the dogs honestly they’d see correcting isn’t this horrible, debilitating ordeal but is instead a great tool the older, social canine uses to instruct the younger ones.  This can be observed anywhere!

In correcting there should be no expensive shock collars you need to purchase.  There should be no unnatural things you have to throw at your dog.  There should be no spraying them with anything, no tethering them to anything, no hitting them with anything, no yelling.  It’s time we get away from all that foolishness. Calmness mixed with firmness is plenty.

Dogs are Not wild animals and should not be treated like a bear learning a trick on a movie set or a dolphin doing a flip to earn a fish from a tourist in Hawaii.  Beware of trainers who only teach bribery and excitement as that is the opposite of how the mother and father dog would raise their young.  Mother Nature always teaches energy control and the older canines always keep a calm watch over their pups.  The mother and father dog (and any balanced, older canine for that matter) are not equipped with treat bags on their hips and do not use high pitched, lavish praise, when instructing their pups.  They are usually monitoring the energy in order to keep the peace and attempting to use as little energy of their own energy as possible.

Dogs are not Dolphins and should not be treated as such. The bond is much, much deeper between man’s best friend and mankind than some slippery, flippery wild animal could ever dream

Corrections, if done correctly, are very beneficial to puppies and dogs just as they can be beneficial to growing children.  If you want to raise a healthy, well adjusted dog (or child) please don’t be an extremist that only trains with excitement and bribery and treats and don’t, on the opposite end of the spectrum, just dominate with harshness and constant physical corrections. Seek out a balance. It’s OK to reward but never to bribe.  It’s OK to correct but never to hurt.  

Here’s a wild concept: Why don’t we look to the dogs for methods on how we should deal with our dogs?  If we honestly observe them we start to see that a correction isn’t so bad when it is performed the way a balanced, older dog would perform it.  In fact, it’s fantastic!  I’ve discovered there is a whole art to it!  It is an art form based in movement, body language and energy control.  A correction is the art of calmness!  And, shockingly, most times it doesn’t even involve a physical touch but is more outmaneuvering the wayward dog and then readjusting their body language until the animal is presenting a calm body position which then helps them calm their own energy.

Learning to correct can be very simple and is shockingly effective in fixing any and all aggression, fear, dominance, hyperactivity, and all other behavioral dilemmas.  The reason that proper corrections should be learned and adopted by more trainers and behaviorists is that it lines up with exactly what dogs do to each other non-stop when they are surrounded by other dogs in order to keep the peace.  It is nature’s way and it is actual energy conservation.  Another huge reason correcting is fantastic is that it actually works and saves times and energy.  The mother dog uses ignoring or extreme focused attention and then right back to ignoring when correcting her young.  She is a remarkable energy saver.

Notice how the mom is walking away and all the pups are following and watching her…NOT the other way round! She walks away first. She ignores and they follow. She leads the way.

The ideal correction is a beautiful thing to behold because it keeps the peace, calms the energy, and lets the game or activity continue on almost as if nothing ever happened.  It is never overboard and yet there is an intense focus to it when applied.  It is always followed by calmness.  I sometimes equate it to getting a foul in basketball.  If you are a b-ball player and you receive a foul you don’t take it and let it get you down, you don’t play the rest of the game on pins and needles out of fear.  Hopefully you learn from it and quickly move on and get your head back in the game.  You don’t totally ignore the foul because you are aware that if you get 5 fouls you are out of the game and of no use to your team/pack.  You stop playing the ball game for a second, think it over, and then resume play.  It is exactly the same with a good correction that is perfectly timed.

Do you see what I’m getting at?  Giving a dog or pup a correction isn’t done to intimidate the dog or belittle it or prove you are a macho Alpha, it is done to help guide the pup.  It is always done to improve the animal’s spirit.  It makes for a better dog.  Like a sculptor chipping away at unnecessary pieces of marble you can chip away at mis-behaviors and unsocial habits in your dog or pup to reveal the true spirit and energy of a socially brilliant and beautiful animal. 

Apparently sculptors don’t need to button their shirts…it’s more artistic that way

Use pressure and tension so that you can then release it and give the dog access to a self soothing calming signal.  If you aren’t correcting the right way your relationship is imbalanced in the respect or trust category and behavioral issues will be the result.  The guitar needs the right tension on the guitar strings to keep it in tune…too much is horrible, it pops the strings.  Not enough tension and you can’t make any music!  Learn to correct and you’ll have real resonance with your dog.

Our dogs desperately need the right corrections filled with just enough tension and pressure and then the right timing to release the tension so it will resonate and just like a guitar make wondrous music

Remember a correction should never create fear or aggression. We don’t want a pathetic, super-submissive dog.  We also don’t want a dominant, hyper brat.  The correction should get the dog’s attention.  When correcting you are attempting to cut off any misbehavior at the earliest identifiable outset.  This makes it much gentler and easier on everyone.  And if you can match their energy level you can communicate what you want or what you don’t want much clearer and more effectively.  This comes with practice, persistence, and patience.

If I  could sit you down and teach you the language of Dog (like French or Italian) the word for correct would be the same exact word for calm and the same exact word for claim.  Correct = Calm.  Correct = Claim.  Claim = Calm.

Your dog will always tell you honestly what it needs.  Let’s build a relationship with our dogs based on respect and trust instead of bribes or brutality.  Let’s make music!

Need help?

Give me a call,

-G

 

 

 

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