famous dogs in literature

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Argos (Homer The Odyssey)

The Hound of the Baskervilles (Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Sherlock Holmes)

Cerberus (Hades’ dog who guards the way outta’ hell)

Little Ann and Big Dan -coonhounds (Wilson Rawls Where the red fern grows)

Buck and White Fang – St. Bernard mix and a Wolf dog (Jack London’s tales)

Merle retriever-hound (Ted Kerasote Merle’s door)

Nana -Newfie (JM Barrie’s Peter Pan)

Old Yeller -yellow blackmouth cur (Fred Gipson’s 1956 novel)

Toto – cairn terrier (Wonderful Wizard of Oz L Frank Baum)

Clifford the Big Red Dog – lab/vizsla (Norman Bridwell)

Fang- Boerhound (Neomastiff in movies) Jk Rowling’s Harry Potter

Snoopy – Beagle (Charles Schultz Peanuts cartoon strip)

Odie (Jim Davis Garfield cartoon strip)

Lassie-Collie (Eric Knight wrote a short story for the Saturday Evening post in 1938)

Tock -a watchdog (Norton Juster The Phantom Toll booth)

Shiloh- Beagle (Phyliss R Naylor Shiloh)

Winn-Dixie (Kate DiCamillo Because of Winn-Dixie)

 

 

 

 

The amazingly accelerated growth rate of our dogs (and how it really applies to training!)

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Have you heard the old saying that one human year of life is the equivalent of seven dog years?  Most of us have and have readily believed it but I’ve got some news for you…it’s totally Wrong!  Let me clarify.

 

In case you didn’t know…A human and a dog are totally different biological creatures and should not be compared with each other in terms of longevity.  As humans we tend to over-think things and usually fall into thinking subjectively on most subjects.  That aside let’s just assume for the sake of this article that we did compare the longevity and growth rate of dogs vs. humans.   Let’s take a closer look at how the accelerated growth rate of our pups (in comparison with a human’s growth rate) can really make or break training and behavioral development.

It takes 1 year to raise a good dog but you’ve got 18 years to try and raise a respectable human!  Let me tell you, dogs are easier!  (Personally I have and am raising both dogs and children) In my day-to-day business of successfully training and behaviorally modifying owners’ habits and their dogs I see many dogs that still act much younger than how they could or should be acting at the age they are at.  Is your dog presenting bad or unsocial or rude behaviors that could be or should have been done away with by six months of age?  For many of you out there the answer is sadly, Yes.

Year one:  puppy goes from the human equivalent of newborn to one-year-old to human equivalent of 15-17 years!

In the pups first year they are transformed from newborn to toddler and from toddler right to what would be the human equivalent of an older teenager ready to breed and looking for independence and responsibility!  The growth rate is astronomical!  If you have a small breed dog the transformation happens even faster because they simply do not have as much growing physically to do.  Please, never forget behaviorally speaking that the brain and body of your dog are so much more closely linked and functioning together than our own imagining, time-traveling human brains.  There’s another saying that we as humans think of our bodies as, “a vehicle that brings our brains to meetings.”  All animals know better though.  They go through life richly connected to their senses and are contented and happy with the simple pleasures.  They are always alive to the moment.  If we miss critical training and behavioral lessons as well as the all important socialization factor at early stages we are doing our new pups great harm!

 

Year two: Teenager pup can add another 10 human years of growth!

Take advantage of the time.  Take action today!  Get your dog or pup outside and socialized.  If you can’t due to behavioral issues that are too great to handle and you’ve been doing the, “Let me put the dog away.” when you have guests, or the classic, “I’ll just cross to the other side of the street when I’m out walking my dogs because they go crazy.”  or even worse, “I’ll walk my dog at 3:00 a.m. so we don’t run into any dogs or people!”  You are shrinking your dogs social circle and time is working against you!  (Helpful Suggested Reading:  my blog- thecaninecalmer.wordpress.com  please Subscribe, The Slight Edge by Jeff Olsen)  You are literally exacerbating the dog or pup’s issues and you are running out of time!

 

(If you already have a dog older than 2 and they have behavioral issues please understand normal training, group classes, obedience training, agility, schutzhund, herding, et cetera will NOT help your dog get over their anxiety, their aggression, their fear, or whatever other crazy, unsocial or rude behavioral patterns they are presenting…all that training will only add frivolous tricks to the equation and cost you plenty of money.  Instead of going that route seek out real help based in calmness and how dog’s move, think, and act in the environment and space around them.

Contact us if you need assistance.  We are rapidly expanding!  My book is almost complete, we are working on training and behavioral videos that will be available for purchase, our training collar works amazingly well (better than most tools on the market), and word keeps spreading about the fantastic difference our natural, calming methods provide for our clients.

Go to gstevensdogtrainer.com for more info

Getting Buff

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Do you exercise?  If not, why not?  And if so, for how long?

If you own a dog the answer should always be a resounding YES, of course I exercise!  And if you own a dog make sure your dog gets physically drained of energy… many times to the point of real exhaustion and good hard panting.  Exercise them till they literally have to drop when they come home and just breath!  

Exercise cures and prevents a host of behavioral issues in our dogs and ourselves.  The positive effects of exercise are well known and documented.  I will not waste time going into all that evidence.

Here are a couple good quotes on exercise…

“The only bad workout is the one that didn’t happen.”

“You can have results or excuses – not both.”

“It does not matter how slowly you go, so long as you do not stop.”

Exercise is a proven reliever or of negative stress = subtraction.  You may find that interesting because what do we do when exercising but add beneficial stress = addition.  That is what exercise is!  The addition of beneficial stress to our body which challenges the right things to grow and removes and reduces the wrong things.  Exercise done properly always stretches the capacity.  I love that!  All of nature bears witness to balance that exists.  Addition and subtraction.

Behaviorally working with your dog is no different.  It should always stretch the capacity, and enlarge the zone you are targeting.  It should leave both you and your dog or puppy calmer, less stressed, and literally healthier… which will lead to strength and confidence in the future.

Always push the boundaries.  Always go past former plateaus.

 

 

-G

5000 Mastiffs

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In the 13th century the Mongol emperor Kublai Khan owned 5000 Mastiffs.  He used them for hunting and war.

We’ve all heard about the “crazy cat lady” who hoards and “rescues” every cat near and far but Kublai clearly had her beat with his 5000 dogs!

Many believe this was the most dogs ever owned by one person.  That is one giant kennel loaded with giant dogs.

pic is of a Neo Mastiff

 

I can only imagine the poor bloke who had to pick up after the 5000 Mastiffs!  Talk about a crappy job.

 

(keeping my posts brief, folks, because I’m getting close to finishing my BOOK!)  -G

Fathom the insanity of a human being who teaches you that you can never disagree with your dog!

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People are nuts.  We are.  If you can’t agree with me that people are nuts please stop reading Now.

For those that can recognize that as humans we are a bit crazy I want to direct your thoughts towards this current crazy time in history.  This interesting time in our lives where we find we have several thousands of professional dog trainers and professional behaviorists that actual teach and want to keep teaching you (as the owner of your dog) that you shouldn’t ever disagree with your dog or pup!  Think about that for a second.

What have we come to?  How has it come to this babying, this coddling, this ridiculously imbalanced and greatly disconnected, poor-excuse for a relationship with our dogs?  How and why do so many pet pros talk dogmatically with 100% absolutism (and quite ferociously toward anyone who might disagree until they are shouted down) about the evil of corrections and that you should never “force” your dog to do anything?  I encourage you to take those questions ponder them honestly and then consider and ask why we also currently have a terrible dog bite record (dogs attacking humans and attacking other dogs) and it’s been steadily increasing for the worse!  I know the two are deeply connected!

 

Don’t just go with the majorities opinion on this topic of disagreeing with your dog vs positive-only and force-free methods.  Please THINK for Yourself and come to your own conclusions.  Examine history, examine the stats, examine the methods of different pro trainers and behaviorists (and especially note and examine their results) and most of all… examine your own dog and the history of dogs and how dogs think and how they experience the world and how dogs communicate and behave.

Then ask yourselves…would the mother dog or father dog constantly bribe their pups with food treats?  Would they constantly attempt to condition them or would they seek to build a healthy relationship based on the dog language and respect and trust and manners (not frivolous tricks and obedience commands)?  Would the parent dogs ever disagree with their young?  Have you as a parent ever had to disagree with your own children?  Was it beneficial in any way?  Did you overdo it or under-do it?

 

What is lacking in our current culture is the balanced approach to disagreeing and so the pathetic “positive-only” dogmatists (who aren’t really that positive in their own lives) scream and shout about how any correction, any disagreement, or forcing your dog or pup to do anything is totally wrong!  Let me tell you outright…this is hogwash and they are wrong!  It’s only wrong to correct or disagree if you are performing it wrong.

Dogs speak through movement, energy, smells, and touching. Most people I meet (and I do this non-stop) are woefully, dreadfully unaware of the intricate and marvelous language of our dogs.  They are woefully unaware because MOST pro behaviorist and trainers are horribly unaware!  The common pro trainer/behaviorist whole premise and approach to training is not beneficial and does NOT prevent behavioral issues from developing!!!

But let’s cut them some slack for a moment.  I don’t want to be too hasty.  Maybe these “professional dog trainers” and “scientific professional behaviorists” haven’t ever see older dogs and how they talk to and deal with younger dogs?  Maybe they haven’t seen the older, balanced dog correct and address the younger imbalanced one?  Maybe these so called “pros” haven’t ever visited a local dog park and observed the dog language?  Maybe they’ve been too long in the library reading about dogs or too long in the laboratory or in the classroom?  Maybe they haven’t had kids of their own or cultivated healthy relationships in their own personal lives?  I don’t know.  What I do know is that anyone who proclaims the “positive-only” approach or acts as a behaviorist and over-charges their clients because they used to work with dolphins is NOT keyed into the amazingly close and wonderfully easy and direct relationship available to us with our domesticated dogs and pups!

They say “Never force a dog to do anything.”  This is horribly bad advice!  I force dogs to do things all the time (and I do it incredibly gently and smoothly) and they end up thanking me for it!  And the owners are also able to soon witness their once terribly behaved aggressive or fearful dogs actually make good decisions.  They see it happen before their very eyes!

One example: I force the nervous dog into social situations and then ask it (in dogspeak) to behave itself (not just do frivolous tricks).  This is the only thing that will change the nervous dog into being social and normal and balanced.

I am a professional because I equip the owners and the dog and get them social extremely quickly all while expanding the dog’s capacity for more and more social situations and all without harsh corrections and without foolishly stuffing food treats down the dog’s throat non-stop and calling it science!  Yes, positive reinforcement is science…it’s OLD science and based on the external motivation of the dog and none of it’s internal drives and motivations!  I’m not even going to bring up the fact that bribing with food is also highly exciting and that over-excitement is the cause of every single behavioral issue any dog faces.  Food treats is not the natural way of parenting.  Bribing with food is how most trainers train WILD animals and that’s fine…but for our domesticated dogs…it’s crap!

Let’s all recognize that many humans are insane and let’s take measured steps to respect their beliefs and opinions, however crazy, but understand it is more than ok to adamantly disagree with their foolishness and to think for ourselves.  Your dogs and pups will thank you!

Seek out the natural ways.  You Can reward your dogs and pups but you Can also disagree with them too and sometimes “force” them into areas of their lives that their fears or aggression would never have taken them before your help!  Stretching the capacity and enlarging the relaxation is the name of the game!  Remember both rewards and corrections should not be the focus…A HEALTHY RELATIONSHIP IS THE FOCUS!!!

Questions?  Call us!  And keep an eye out for my coming book…it’s gonna’ be epic!  And balanced with natural techniques and they will, of course, get you the best results you could imagine!  Forget positive or negative reinforcement and focus on being a dog parent.

-G

 

Garrett Stevens: Dog Detective

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I am a detective.  Observation is the first step to understanding in my field of study.  The more keenly I observe the more success I’ve found. I am constantly unraveling mysteries.  Solving cases.  Each and every person and dog I come into contact with provides me with clues and evidences.  I cultivate my powers of deduction.  Reasoning.  Thinking.  I am cautious never to jump to conclusions and yet I am always puzzling out the possibilities.

Over the years I have learned to follow my hunches.  Gut instinct is something I have learned to rely on.  Still I’m always searching for hard evidence.  Just the facts.

My job is to uncover the truth.  The more adept at finding clues and following them the more clearly the truth unfolds into tangible, solid, images.  This is no mirage.  And the truth is always waiting to be discovered.

“I have trained myself to notice what I see.” -Sherlock Holmes

I pull up to another house on yet another appointment.  It’s drizzly and gray outside.   A continual dropping of cool precipitation falls around me.  Real Tacoma weather.  The weather is but a reflection of many of the bleak situations my clients face.

My clients.  All the same.  All different.  Poor folks who got mixed up dealing with a rough crowd.  Or should I say a “ruff” crowd?  Dogs.

Dogs don’t mind trouble.  Some dogs even look for it.  Some were born and bred for it.

I ring the doorbell.  Then I clear my mind of all the thoughts that can sneak into it and cling there.  Another door means another dog and another owner.  Taking a deep breath I brace myself. Time to focus.  Time to see.

I drink in the little details.

The welcome mat that tells me the client is a “dog lover,”…that a “Spoiled rotten dog lives there.”  I wonder, have they fallen for the dog’s charms and taken an oversimplified view of the dog’s intelligence not recognizing the dog as a manipulative mastermind thus leading to a plethora of behavioral issues?

I am conscious of the amount of time it takes them to come open the door…Are they fully invested in solving the case and getting to the bottom of it or only half-hearted in their attempts to better their own situation?

There are several spider webs in the corners of their porch…When was the last time they cleaned the porch, or their house, for that matter, and are they a painstaking person enough to take the time and action necessary for the pleasant resolution of their case?

I hear them approach.  And, of course, I heard the beast’s rapid approach before them…Did the dog slam into the door while barking ferociously?  Was it out of fearful, territorial behavior?  Was the dog assertively claiming the doorway and warning whoever is behind it?  Me.  I’m there.  Waiting to clap eyes upon the mongrel and his master.

I’ve got to be alert in this line of work.  Danger can rear it’s ugly head in the blink of an eye.  Dogs are fast.  People are not.

“It is my business to know what other people don’t know.” -Sherlock Holmes

Dogs are powerful.  Most dogs have power enough in their jaws to easily break bones.  Fortunately for me they usually choose not to.  Still, I’ve got to be alert and observant and ready for anything.

Dogs come equipped with great weapons.  But I also am armed.  I come armed with an understanding of an ancient and primal language.  I have my observational skills.  And I always carry my trusty bag.

My bag has literally saved my skin more times than I care to remember.  From Pit bulls to Pekingese there’s been so many bites my bag has taken in place of my arm!

There’s this myth that exists…most folks believe it.  It goes something like, “Dogs just want to please.”  Give me a break!  Boy, do we need to wise up. That’s like saying “Kids just want to please.”  It simply isn’t true in most cases.  That’s why I’m here though, to find the truth and see what others cannot.

I’ve got to connect the pieces, find the clues, and solve the case.  It’s what I do as a dog detective.