“I have trained myself to notice what I see”

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Dog behavior and language can, like learning another language, be broken down in its simplest of components.  It can be elementary, my dear Watson, if you have the eye.  The title quote of this article I’ve taken from that most fantastic and fictional of all detectives, Mr. Sherlock Holmes.

Holmes was a masterful observer.  In The Adventure of the Blanched Soldier we see Sherlock easily identifying where Mr. Dodd has come from, what type of employment he has, what area he is from, and the beginnings of why Mr. Dodd came desperately looking for the super slueth’s help.

MR DODD:  “You see everything.”

SHERLOCK HOLMES:  “I see no more than you, but I have trained myself to notice what I see.”

In Sherlock’s next sentence calls his legendary skill the “science of observation.”  Whether this incredible observation of Holmes’ is science or art matters little.  What matters is that it is definitely valuable in every form of problem solving.

Problem solving is precisely what we do every day at our dog language center and whenever we are amongst dog loving families in their homes.  If you desire to be a better dog owner – and you should desire it because most people, frankly, are very poor owners when it comes to proper animal husbandry – if you desire improvement in dog behavior you must learn to observe then act!  (This poor animal husbandry is true especially between people and dogs because there are so many foolhardy behavioral myths dog owners cling to.  Can you imagine if I ranked and rated how great dog owners were or how terrible they were like people do with businesses on Google or Yelp or wherever else?  God forbid…because I’d be forced, if I was being honest, to hand out a host of 1 stars left and right due to an extreme disregard for nature’s ways, the value of calmness, and due to the piss poor relationships we consistently see between pet owners and their dogs!  We often observe that the owner adores their dog and the dog accepts that adoration readily and controls everything and acts as if they could care less about the bond with their owner or… on the opposite end the dog may be insanely unsocial towards everyone else in the world due to the extreme obsession allowed in the relational bond by the owner.

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If you want to judge a dog on behavior look at how it touches and interacts with its owner and examine how it accepts touch from a guest or a little child!  Touch is the first of the Four Pillars of Dog Language and the most critical for human-dog interaction.

If you were to work just one day in our kennel you’d see how insane dogs can act because people (their own owners) don’t know much or care much about animals and nature’s way.  Perhaps I should clarify and say that they care about all the wrong things when it comes to their dog and hardly ever care or even notice all the things that lead to problematic behavior!  That’s stating it more succinctly.

Friends, we MUST train ourselves to notice what we see!

Please pay attention to the details.  You have to if you desire any sort of change within your dog or pup behaviorally speaking.

I have loved and been fascinated by all animals and nature since my earliest memories.  Let’s not fail our dogs by believing status quo dog myths concerning their behavior or language.  Let’s all look deeper…let’s ask more questions…let’s notice what we see!

Garrett Stevens is author of the hot-listed book, Dog Myths: What you Believe about dogs can come back to Bite You! and the super practical book to reverse or prevent anxiety in puppies or dogs, So Long Separation Anxiety.  Sample them today on/at Amazon, Apple iBooks, at Barnes and Noble, and at several other places and books reading platforms.

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Garrett Stevens: Dog Detective

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I am a detective.  Observation is the first step to understanding in my field of study.  The more keenly I observe the more success I find. I am constantly unraveling mysteries.  Solving cases.  Each and every person and dog I come into contact with provides me with clues and evidences.  I cultivate my powers of deduction.  Reasoning.  Thinking.  I am cautious never to jump to conclusions and yet I am always puzzling out the possibilities.

Over the years I have learned to follow my hunches.  Gut instinct is something I have learned to rely on.  Still I’m always searching for hard evidence.  Just the facts.

My job is to uncover the truth.  The more adept at finding clues and following them the more clearly the truth unfolds into tangible, solid, images.  This is no mirage.  And the truth is always waiting to be discovered.

“I have trained myself to notice what I see.” -Sherlock Holmes

I pull up to another house on yet another appointment.  It’s drizzly and gray outside.   A continual dropping of cool precipitation falls around me.  Real Tacoma weather.  The weather is but a reflection of many of the bleak situations my clients face.

My clients.  All the same.  All different.  Poor folks who got mixed up dealing with a rough crowd.  Or should I say a “ruff” crowd?  Dogs.

Dogs don’t mind trouble.  Some dogs even look for it.  Some were born and bred for it.

I ring the doorbell.  Then I clear my mind of all the thoughts that can sneak into it and cling there.  Another door means another dog and another owner.  Taking a deep breath I brace myself. Time to focus.  Time to see.

I drink in the little details.

The welcome mat that tells me the client is a “dog lover,”…that a “Spoiled rotten dog lives there.”  I wonder, have they fallen for the dog’s charms and taken an oversimplified view of the dog’s intelligence not recognizing the dog as a manipulative mastermind thus leading to a plethora of behavioral issues?

I am conscious of the amount of time it takes them to come open the door…Are they fully invested in solving the case and getting to the bottom of it or only half-hearted in their attempts to better their own situation?

There are several spider webs in the corners of their porch…When was the last time they cleaned the porch, or their house, for that matter, and are they a painstaking person enough to take the time and action necessary for the pleasant resolution of their case?

I hear them approach.  And, of course, I heard the beast’s rapid approach before them…Did the dog slam into the door while barking ferociously?  Was it out of fearful, territorial behavior?  Was the dog assertively claiming the doorway and warning whoever is behind it?  Me.  I’m there.  Waiting to clap eyes upon the mongrel and his master.

I’ve got to be alert in this line of work.  Danger can rear it’s ugly head in the blink of an eye.  Dogs are fast.  People are not.

“It is my business to know what other people don’t know.” -Sherlock Holmes

Dogs are powerful.  Most dogs have power enough in their jaws to easily break bones.  Fortunately for me they usually choose not to.  Still, I’ve got to be alert and observant and ready for anything.

Dogs come equipped with great weapons.  But I also am armed.  I come armed with an understanding of an ancient and primal language.  I have my observational skills.  And I always carry my trusty bag.

My bag has literally saved my skin more times than I care to remember.  From Pit bulls to Pekingese there’s been so many bites my bag has taken in place of my arm!

There’s this myth that exists…most folks believe it.  It goes something like, “Dogs just want to please.”  Give me a break!  Boy, do we need to wise up. That’s like saying “Kids just want to please.”  It simply isn’t true in several cases.  That’s why I’m here though, to find the truth and see what others cannot.

I’ve got to connect the pieces, find the clues, and solve the case.  I’ve got to help the client.  It’s what I do as a dog detective.

-G