Speed hides mistakes. SLOW DOWN and you’ll make less mistakes with your dog.

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Sifu Hill, my Wing Chun Kung Fu instructor, always tells his students that “Speed hides mistakes.”  As a martial artist master with 50 years experience in differing martial arts (40 years studying Wing Chun) my Sifu knows what he’s talking about.  He often exhorts the individual that is going too fast to slow down in order to get the technique down properly.  Speed may look flashy to the beginner but the master knows that a good Wing Chun practitioner should be able to work the method both slowly and quickly and that doing it slowly and smoothly is the best way forward for the beginner.  It is the same with the Garrett Stevens Method of dog behavioral rehab and natural dog handling.

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This is my Mook Yan Jong, my “wooden man dummy.” It is a necessity for the serious Wing Chun disciple. I begin by SLOWLY working the forms around the imaginary human arms and legs while simultaneously striking the hard wood of the dummy sometimes causing tiny micro fractures in my arms which toughen the bones upon repair. I am loving it!                                     For more info check out Hill’s Wing Chun

Mainstream dog training techniques also hide many mistakes behaviorally speaking.  Many dog trainers go fast because A. They’ve been taught to go fast and to continually motivate. and B. They know (in some cases) they can hide a dog’s mistakes and make themselves and the dog they are working with look better momentarily.  They encourage their students to “work the dog” and take fast turns.  These turns do a full circle when heeling (which, incidentally, is what overexcited or neurotic dogs do – they circle and pace and stare).  The Garrett Stevens Method is different because we also encourage a quick turn to interrupt problematic eye contact when a dog is about to stare at an energy-escalating stimuli BUT (and this is huge) then we have the owner slow down immediately and many times even instruct them to stop moving for a moment.  We do NOT have them do a full circle like so many trainers and behaviorists do – instead we have our clients turn 180 degrees then greatly slow down their movement and the dog’s.  This way the dog’s body and the dog’s energy is not allowed to complete the turn and hype the dog back up again by way of letting him/her continue to stare and in many cases continue to threaten the stimuli.  The Garrett Stevens Method is 180 degrees different from what most trainers are teaching – that is why it works so well!  We do NOT attempt to hide mistakes.  We point them out and then move on towards success.  By tapping into the 4 Pillars of dog language one will find it is much, much easier to influence a dog’s energy and behavior – especially when compared and contrasted with other dog training and behavior mod methods.

Your dog, as the member of a fast living, fast dying, fast moving species, may seek to control the situation through speed and by speeding your movements up.  Don’t let that happen!  Stay as calm as possible.  Don’t talk a lot while attempting to slow the dog down.  Take action quickly then take action smoothly and very slowly.  Now pause and take action even slower.  We desire DE-escalation.  We need to keep experiencing the energy drop and guide the dog to do the same.  (For more info look for my third book on all things dog and human behavior about the 5 incredible senses of our dogs and the 4 Pillars of dog language!)

Please don’t be one of the millions and millions that are impressed by watching some Belgian or German Shepherd briskly heeling like a robot, doing circles and trotting beside the handler on Youtube.  If we could ask more questions of that same exact dog behaviorally in many cases it may be found wanting.  Is that same dog that was excitably performing the heel on Youtube trustworthy and calm near human babies?  Is that same dog calm around other members of his/her own species?  Can they play with other dogs?  Can they be off leash and calm at a buddy’s barbecue?  Is the dog going to destroy the home when the owner/handler leaves or is it calm enough to manage itself maturely?  Speed hides mistakes.

There’s a saying that came to us all from the Military.  It goes “Slow is smooth – smooth is fast.”  Take it to heart when handling your dog or pup.  Take it especially to heart when handling the out of control, or fearful, or aggressive dog.  If I had a saying it would be something like “Speed up socialization (because we can never socialize enough) and Slow down the dog or pup’s movement in the midst of that socialization.”

Happy Handling and keep Slowing Down and getting it right,

-G

I just wanted to Thank You

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I just wanted to pause for a moment and thank you all for reading my stuff.  I know I probably come off like an arrogant prick occasionally and please understand that’s not my intention it’s probably just who I am (hahaha- little joke – that’s partially true).

I am so blessed though whenever I think of my readers (readers of my books and of this blog) and those that are willing to look boldly and honestly at themselves and to look with a curious and open mind at their dogs as we imagine a brighter future together.  It is a very exciting time to be alive and active.

I also wanted to let you all know that I don’t get online and critique some random electrician’s wiring job on a new home, and I don’t write bad reviews of restaurants, and I don’t criticize how my mechanic could have done a better job.  I leave those professionals, and others like them, space to do their work as genuine professionals in their specific fields.  Unfortunately, this is hardly the case where dog trainers are concerned because every Tom, Dick, and Harry has had a dog of his own.  And the internet crowds obviously do not mind, even as lay people, critiquing (and or lying about) an expert that has bled and sweat for many years to build a successful business that has served thousands of dogs over the years and stimulated authentic and lasting change in both canine and human alike.  It’s strange to me that these lay folk, these non-professionals, these people that have never helped a dog with true human aggression or with severe dog-dog aggression (let alone handled thousands of them), would be so free with their criticisms.  Maybe it’s just the foolish trap of the inter webs?  Perhaps they’ve never read Roosevelt’s classic “Man In The Arena” speech about how “It is not the critic who counts…”  Friends, I have been a man in this specific arena for a long time and wanted to take a moment to thank you all for sticking with me.  Your comments and legitimate questions and shares on this blog cheer me on.

So if, at any time on this blog of mine, I seem a bit assertive it is because the dog training world and many a dog owner we encounter is filled with high emotions and with misinformation concerning nature and dogs.  I am trying daily to calm and clarify a portion of it for all our clients and for all our faithful followers.  If I seem a bit defensive occasionally or on the attack in my writing, it is because I see hosts of damaged dogs and hear stories from clients who tried other training (often with methods filled with ridiculous and unnatural training techniques) before those same clients happened upon our custom behavior mod. and finally began to see a difference within their pet.  I see these dogs and hear these true and sometimes harrowing stories over and over, day after day, month after month, and year after year.  And so, instead of mourning for a lost industry that cranks out neurotic dog after neurotic dog, personally, I get active and assertive and – I get to work.  I am assertive because I actually care!  Thank you for your understanding.

As many of you know, we train and rehab dogs around the clock – we don’t have the time or the luxury to give “free evaluations” like many dog training companies do because all our hours are filled to the brim with private session after private session, and with time spent helping those dogs fortunate enough to grab a spot in our behavioral board and train at Stevens Family Kennels.  A bulk of our life is spent serving dogs and clients and trying to fix problems.

Thank you so much for taking the time to read and to share our stories and my behavioral training or “anti-training” advice – each time you do you never really know just what dog owner and dog you could help.  And that’s exciting!  Thank you so much for reading my two books and please keep an eye out for the third – in it I will reveal even more of our instinctual methods.  I promise if you apply our stuff properly (using the 4 Pillars of dog language and the Garrett Stevens method) it truly works to calm dogs down and to help them align their senses, and it works to help you build a healthier relationship with the unique and fascinating species we all simply call…a dog!

Thanks again,

-G

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